It never ceases to amaze us that Subaru doesn’t rank among the most popular cars in South Africa. They are reliable and great to drive, and when you are choosing a car for yourself, what else matters? Subaru is one of those enigmatic brands that you see on the road and take little notice of unless there is one baring down on you in your rear-view mirror. But for those who have had the chance to drive and even own a Subaru, you have an understanding of why their owners swear by them.

We were given the chance to put the Legacy GT through its paces for just over a week and when it came time to returning it, we were both satisfied and sad to see it go. The Legacy falls into that segment of car manufacturing that is probably one of the most competitive out there. The family/business sedan market has no shortage of options available to the consumer and the competition is stiff.

The Legacy GT is a beautiful looking car. It is long and sleek with design accents littered through its frame to add to its sporty appeal and business allure. The car has a presence on the road both because of its size and its audacious trimmings. The Legacy has a professional side profile and overall look to it, but at the same time the large air intake on the bonnet is an injection of crazy. And it is that injection that sets Subaru apart from the competition.

It never ceases to amaze us that Subaru doesn’t rank among the most popular cars in South Africa. They are reliable and great to drive, and when you are choosing a car for

The Legacy is fantastic to drive. It whips off the line like a sprinter in the Olympic finals and has fabulous speed at the top end. It handles perfectly both on the smooth open road, as well as around corners. The Legacy GT is a well-balanced example of Japanese engineering. Subaru’s engineering is so sought after that Toyota’s Car of the Year finalist, the 86, is pretty much all Subaru where it counts.

Inside the Legacy is no different; since the last version we tested there have been one of two design modifications to the interior systems. Everything is much cleaner and the driver display and entertainment display have better functionality. We didn’t like the fact that the doors do not auto-lock when the car is driving and if you do lock them yourself, they do not unlock centrally without pushing the button. Also, in a car that costs around R500 000, the fact that only one of the windows is fully automatic winding up and down seems like a silly place to cut corners. But aside from these minor complaints, there is no way to fault the Legacy GT.

We can’t stress it enough that when it comes to Subaru, just drive one and you will understand. What’s the worst that could happen? You may discover something you never knew you loved.